Sliding Window – A single hung window placed on it’s side with tracks in frame that hold sashes in place during operation horizontally.

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Single-Hung Windows – One moving sash which slides vertically up and down within the frame tracks. Todays advanced systems (counterweights, pretensioned springs, or friction) counterbalance the operable sashes, which have all but phased out the old ‘cord’ and counterweight’ system. Typically utilize brush-type weatherstripping, which don’t seal quite as tightly as compression weatherstripping.

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Double-Hung Windows – Two moving sashes which slide vertically up and down within the frame tracks. Todays spring systems counterbalance the operable sashes, which have all but phased out the old ‘cord’ and counterweight’ system

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PROJECTED WINDOWS – Sash/pane assembly rotates inward or outward allowing for ventilation and easier cleaning access. Typically utilizes pliable synthetic rubber weather stripping that compression-seals the sash.

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Casement Windows – Operating sashes side-hinged and typically swings outward. 100% ventilating. ashes may close on vertical mullion at center or a floating astragal to close on eachother

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Awning Windows – Hinge on the head jamb, are typically wider than they are tall.

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Hopper WIndows – Hinge on frame sill, commonly used in commercial construction, particularly in basements near grade, are typically wider than they are tall.

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Pivot WIndows –  Sashes rotate 90 degrees or 180 degrees around an axis frame.

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